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Our Projects

Below are just a few of the projects we have worked on

Knoll View Courtyard

A ‘work in progress’ project
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Restoration of Spargrove

RK Stone’s involvement in the restoration of a once grand Somerset estate included the complete restoration of the 15th century Brew House.
The ancient site was derelict and the main house had been subject to a fire. Fragments of buildings provided clues for restoration and were re-used, whether for path edgings or to be displayed above the ancient fireplace in the Brew House.
Our builders discovered the remains of a bridge while digging out the 13th century moat (pictured).
All the flagstones on the ground floors were lifted and numbered then, after insulation and underground heating had been installed, carefully replaced.
The door to the Brew House kitchen is our skilful re-creation of what was left of the original. It is made on one side from English quartered oak and the other from witch elm secured together with handmade wrought iron nails.

Restoration of Poyntington Manor, Dorset

Poyntington Manor is a grade II listed manor house a few miles from Sherborne.  It dates back to the late 15th century and was refenestrated during the 16th and 17th centuries.  We, as a company, carried out extensive sympathetic restoration to the house over a period of years.

Silk Mill

It is thought that local man Samuel Rodbard financed the building of the Mill in Evercreech to create much needed jobs to replace those lost with the failure of the local woollen cloth industry and so from 1792, the three storey building became known as Mr Ward’s Silk Factory.  It was originally a long rectangular building with the wing added between 1841 and 1867.  It is thought that thread from this very mill was used in the creation of Queen Victoria’s wedding dress.

We bought the building in 1996 and applied for planning permission to convert it into houses.  The main building became a terrace of six three storey dwellings, each named to show it’s origin: Spindle House, Yarn House, Winders Cottage, Bobbin Cottage, Loom Cottage and Weavers’ Corner.  At the rear of the Mill there was an old coach house, in a very poor condition and listed on Mendip District Council’s At Risk Register – this became a two bedroom bungalow, name The Old Folly.

Old Folly and Strippy Close

A village development of three houses built in the old grounds of Evercreech House.  Two three storey town houses face the road, constructed from reclaimed local stone and double Roman tiles, with a three bedroom dorma bungalow to the rear.